Online High School




Education at your fingertips

Core Courses

Our online program offers various classes in Core Course areas such as:

  • English
  • Math
  • Science
  • Foreign Language
  • Social Science

Advanced Placement (AP) Courses

AP courses are also offered to those students wanting to compete at a higher level.

All Courses:

  • Meet A-G requirements
  • WASC accredited
  • NCAA approved
  • Common Core State standards Aligned (CCSS)

High School Credit

  • Students completing any course through this program will receive high school credit. Weighted GPA for AP courses is determined by each individual school district.
  • Transferability of credit is determined by each student’s school site.
  • Students must receive prior approval from their school before registering for a class.
  • Students can download the approval forms or they may use a form from their school site (if available).
Information Sessions
Day(s)/Date(s)
Time
Location
Saturday April 1, 2017 11am CSUSB Palm Desert Campus
37-500 Cook Street, Palm Desert
Saturday April 8, 2017 9am CSUSB Yasuda Center
5500 University Pkwy, San Bernardino
Saturday April 8, 2017 1pm Chino Valley USD
Alternative Education Center
15650 Pipeline Avenue, Chino Hills
Summer 2017 (First Semester Courses)
Registration Dates Session Dates
Session 1:
April 3 - June 2, 2017
Session 1:
June 12 - June 30
Summer 2017 (Second Semester Courses)
Registration Dates Session Dates
Session 2:
April 3 - June 26, 2017
Session 2:
July 10 – July 28

Core Courses: $250 per quarter/per semester course
AP Courses: $325 per quarter/per semester course
Fees are non-refundable.


About Our Instructors:

  • The online instructors employed for this program meet requirements of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, and provide a high level of student/teacher engagement. All instructors hold current teaching credentials and are trained to teach effectively in an online environment.
  • Instructors are available for office hours one day per week to assist students.

Student Information:

  • Each course requires a minimum of 25 hours per week, to complete a semester class.
  • Students are required to meet face to face with their course instructor on the first day of class for an orientation and to sign a course agreement.
  • Final exams are to be completed face to face with the course instructor. Other arrangements may be considered such as Skype and/or any other type of visual communication approved by the instructor.
  • All students are encouraged to maintain a notebook with course content notes and notations regarding dates and times of student/instructor interaction.
Download the Online High School flyer (PDF)

Dates & Fees***

Information Sessions
Day(s)/Date(s)
Time
Location
Saturday April 1, 2017 11am CSUSB Palm Desert Campus
37-500 Cook Street, Palm Desert
Saturday April 8, 2017 9am CSUSB Yasuda Center
5500 University Pkwy, San Bernardino
Saturday April 8, 2017 1pm Chino Valley USD
Alternative Education Center
15650 Pipeline Avenue, Chino Hills
Summer 2017 (First Semester Courses)
Registration Dates Session Dates
Session 1:
April 3 - June 2, 2017
Session 1:
June 12 - June 30
Summer 2017 (Second Semester Courses)
Registration Dates Session Dates
Session 2:
April 3 - June 26, 2017
Session 2:
July 10 – July 28

Courses are held year round.

  • Core Courses: $250 per quarter/per semester course
  • AP Courses: $325 per quarter/per semester course
  • Fees are non-refundable.


*** Fees are subject to change

Summer 2017 Courses


English

  • English 9
  • English 9H
  • English 10CP
  • English 10H
  • English 11CP
  • English 12CP
  • ERWC

Math

  • Algebra 2
  • Algebra 2H
  • Geometry
  • Trig-PreCal
  • Trig-PreCal H
  • Integrated Math 1
  • Integrated Math 2
  • Integrated Math 2H
  • Integrated Math 3
  • Integrated Math 3H

Science

  • Chemistry
  • Chemistry H
  • *Health

Foreign Language

  • Spanish 1
  • Spanish 2
  • Spanish 3H

Social Science

  • *Economics
  • *Economics H
  • *Government
  • US History
  • World History
  • World History H

Advanced Placement (AP)

  • AP English 11
  • AP English 12
  • AP Psychology
  • AP US History
  • AP Statistics
  • AP Macro Economics (S1)
  • AP Micro Economics (S2)
  • AP Calculus AB
  • AP Calculus BC**
  • *One semester course can be taken either session 1 or 2

Courses in the Program*

English Math Social Science Science Foreign Language
English 9CP Geometry Economics Chemistry Spanish 1
English 9H Algebra 2 Economics H Chemistry H Spanish 2
English 10CP Algebra 2H Government Health Spanish 3H
English 10H Integrated Math 1 World History French 1
English 11CP Integrated Math 2 World History H French 2
English 12CP Integrated Math 2H US History  
ERWC Integrated Math 3      
  Integrated Math 3H      
  Trig-PreCal H      
  Trig-PreCal H      

Advanced Placement Courses *

English Math Social Science
AP English 11 AP Statistics AP Psychology
AP English 12 Calculus AB AP US History
  AP Calculus AB AP Economics
  AP Calculus BC** AP History
  AP Government
  AP Psychology
  AP Psychology
  AP Macro Economics (1st session only)
  AP Micro Economics (2nd session only)

**Must have previously failed the course

Not all courses are offered every quarter.

All Courses:

  • Meet A-G requirements
  • WASC accredited
  • NCAA approved
  • Common Core State standards Aligned (CCSS)

Not all courses are offered every quarter.

 - expandENGLISH CLASSES
English 9CP
This is an English course designed for the ninth grade student whose goal is to graduate from high school and meet the academic admission requirements of the University of California and the California State University system.

English 9 Honors
This is an English course designed to meet the needs of the student working above grade level. The emphasis is on the further development of writing ability in general, the introduction of analytical writing and the writing domains specified in the District Writing Portfolio, abstract and critical thinking, an introduction to literary genres, and an appreciation of literature. Mythology and a Shakespearean play are included as major content areas. Other things covered include vocabulary development, listening and speaking skills, and further improvement in the student’s library and research skills. The course is conducted at an accelerated level and is designed to prepare students for other English Honors and accelerated courses in grades ten through twelve.

English 10CP
This is an English course designed for the tenth grade student whose goal is to graduate from high school and meet the academic admission requirements of the University of California and the California State University system. This year long course will emphasize an integrated language.

English 10 Honors
This is an English course designed to meet the needs of the student working above grade level. The emphasis is on the further development of writing ability in general, the development of analytical writing and the writing domains specified in the District Writing Portfolio, abstract and critical thinking, further study of literary genres, and an appreciation of literature. Mythology and a Shakespearean play are included as major content areas. Other things covered include vocabulary development, listening and speaking skills, and further improvement in the student’s library and research skills. The course is conducted at an accelerated level and is designed to prepare students for other English Honors and courses in grades eleven and twelve.

English 11CP
This is an English course designed to meet the needs of the student working at or above grade level who plans to attend a college or university after high school. The emphasis is on the further development of writing ability in general. The development of analytical writing and the writing domains specified in the District Writing Portfolio, abstract and critical thinking, further study of literary genres, an appreciation of literature, and an understanding of American literature and major American literary movements. Other things covered include vocabulary development, listening and speaking skills, and further improvement in the student’s library and research skills. The course is conducted at an accelerated level and is designed to prepare students for the college prep course in twelfth grade.

English 12CP
This is an English course designed to meet the needs of the student working at or above grade level who plans to attend a college or university after high school. The emphasis is on the further development of writing ability in general, the development of analytical writing and the writing domains specified in the District Writing portfolio, abstract and critical thinking, further study of literary genres, an appreciation of literature, and an understanding of British literature and major British literary movements. Other things covered include vocabulary development, listening and speaking skills, and further improvement in the student’s library and research skill. The course is conducted at an accelerated level and is designed to prepare students for a college or university.

 - expandMATH CLASSES
Geometry
The Geometry curriculum includes the study of two- and three- dimensions from an algebraic point of view so that students can translate between synthetic and coordinate representations; deduce properties of figures using transformations and coordinates; identify and classify figures in terms of congruence and similarity, and apply these relationships; interpret and use three-dimensional objects; represent problem situations with geometric models and apply properties of figures; utilize the extension of trigonometry to angles greater than 90 degrees as a precursor to the development of circular function trigonometry in later courses; analyze properties of Euclidean transformations and relate translations to vectors; and develop an understanding of an axiomatic system through investigations and proofs. This course incorporates all of the California State Content Standards for Geometry.

Algebra 1
Algebra 1 provides a foundation of mathematical tools for thinking and communicating symbolically across all mathematics courses. The notion of variables and symbol manipulation and the relationships between them are the core concepts of algebra. The algebra curriculum includes the study of algebraic concepts and methods so that students can represent situations that involve quantities with expressions, equations, inequalities, and matrices; use tables and graphs as tools to interpret expressions, equations and inequalities; operate on expressions and matrices and solve equations and inequalities; and appreciate the power of mathematical abstraction and symbolism. This course incorporates all of the California State Content Standards for Algebra 1.

Algebra 2
Algebra II should complement and expand on all the mathematical concepts of Algebra 1 and some concepts of Geometry. Review of those concepts should be integrated throughout the course. Emphasis should be placed on abstract thinking skills, the function concept, and the algebraic solution of problems in various content areas, including the solution of systems of equations, logarithmic and exponential functions, the binomial theorem, and the complex number system. This course incorporates all of the California State Content Standards for Algebra II and three standards for Probability and Statistics.

Algebra 2 Honors
Algebra II Honors should complement and expand on all the mathematical concepts of Algebra 1 and some concepts of Geometry. Review of those concepts should be integrated throughout the course. Emphasis should be placed on abstract thinking skills, the function concept, and the algebraic solution of problems in various content areas, including the solution of systems of equations, logarithmic and exponential functions, the binomial theorem, and the complex number system. This course incorporates all of the California State Content Standards for Algebra II.

Integrated Math 1
Integrated Math I is the first course of a three course sequence including Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Integrated Math III. This course satisfies the California Common Core Standards for Integrated Math I and is intended for all ninth graders. Integrated Math I builds and strengthens students’ conceptual knowledge of functions, linear functions, equations, inequalities, sequences, basic exponential functions, systems of linear equations, systems of linear inequalities, one variable descriptive statistics, correlation and residuals, analyzing categorical data, mathematical modeling, and both coordinate and transformational geometries.

Integrated Math 2
Integrated Math 2 is the second course of a three course sequence including Integrated Math 1, Integrated Math 2, and Integrated Math 3. This course satisfies the California Common Core Standards for Integrated Math 2. For the Integrated Math 2 course, students continue to develop algebra and geometry skills through engaging and real life applications. Students will build off of the standards they mastered in Integrated Math 1 building on geometry and algebra skills. Students will demonstrate abilities to reason logically and to understand and apply mathematical processes and concepts using algebraic operations, geometry topics with spatial sense, data analysis, and probability. Integrated Math 2 builds and strengthens students' conceptual knowledge of tools of geometry, introduction to proofs, properties of triangles, similarity through transformations, congruence through transformations, using congruence theorems, properties of quadrilaterals, trigonometry, circles, arcs and sectors of circles, figures, quadratic functions, polynomials and quadratics functions, and their inverses.

Integrated Math 2 Honors
Integrated Math 2 Honor is the second course of a three course sequence including Integrated Math 1, Integrated Math 2, and Integrated Math 3. This course satisfies the California Common Core Standards for Integrated Math 2 Honors. For the Integrated Math 2 Honors course, students continue to develop algebra and geometry skills through engaging and real life applications. Students will build off of the standards they mastered in Integrated Math 1 building on geometry and algebra skills. Students will demonstrate abilities to reason logically and to understand and apply mathematical processes and concepts using algebraic operations, geometry topics with spatial sense, data analysis and probability. The honors series is designed to help students reach the AP Calculus courses.

Integrated Math 3 Description of Course
Integrated Math 3 is the third course of a three course series which includes all of the common core state standards. It builds and strengthens students’ conceptual knowledge of tools of geometry, similarity through transformations, symmetry, congruence though transformations, trigonometry, quadratic functions, polynomials and quadratics functions, and their inverses. Integrated Math 3 also includes linear relations and functions, systems of equations, polynomials and their functions, radical functions and relations, exponential and logarithmic functions, and a continued study of statistics.

Integrated Math 3 Honors Description of Course
Integrated Mathematics 3 Honors is the third course in a three course series which includes all of the Common Core State Standards from Integrated Mathematics 2 Honors. It builds and strengthens students’ conceptual knowledge of tools of geometry, similarity through transformations, symmetry, congruence through transformations and trigonometry. Integrated Mathematics 3 Honors also includes linear relations and functions, quadratic functions, systems of equations, polynomial functions, inverse functions, radical functions and relations, exponential and logarithmic functions, and a continued study of statistics.

Trigonometry/ Pre-Calculus
Trigonometry combines many of the algebraic, geometric, and trigonometric techniques needed to prepare students for the study of calculus and strengthens their understanding of problems and mathematical reasoning in solving problems. This course takes a functional approach towards those topics. Students learn the techniques of matrix manipulation so they can solve systems of linear equations in any number of variables. The trigonometry functions studied are defined geometrically, rather than in terms of algebraic equations. Students must understand the concepts of trigonometric functions and have the ability to prove basic trigonometric identities. This course incorporates a combination of the California State Content Standards in Mathematical Analysis, Linear Algebra, Trigonometry, and Probability and Statistics.

Trigonometry / Pre-Calculus Honors
Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus Honors combines many of the algebraic, geometric, and trigonometric techniques needed to prepare students for the study of calculus and strengthens their understanding of problems and mathematical reasoning in solving problems. This course takes a functional approach towards those topics. Students learn the techniques of matrix manipulation so they can solve systems of linear equations in any number of variables. The trigonometry functions studied are defined geometrically, rather than in terms of algebraic equations. Students must understand the concepts of trigonometric functions and have the ability to prove basic trigonometric identities. This course incorporates a combination of the California State Content Standards in Mathematical Analysis, Linear Algebra, Trigonometry, and Probability and Statistics.


 - expandSCIENCE CLASSES
Biology
The student will master an understanding of the nature of living things, their environment, and their relationships with man. The student will know unity, interaction, continuity, and diversity of life. The major concepts that will be covered are cell biology, genetics, ecology, evolution, and physiology. Students will have access to up-to-date laboratory equipment, science equipment, and technology. This course is aligned to State adopted content standards in science.

Biology Honors
The student will master an understanding of the nature of living things, their environment, and their relationships with man. The student will know unity, interaction, continuity, and diversity of life. The major concepts that will be covered are cell biology, genetics, ecology, evolution, and physiology. Students will have access to up- to -date laboratory equipment, science equipment, and technology. This course is aligned to State adopted content standards in science.

Chemistry
Chemistry is a sequential, hierarchical science that is descriptive and theoretical. Chemistry requires high-level problem-solving skills, such as designing experiments and solving word problems. For students to learn concepts of chemistry, they must learn new vocabulary, including the rules for naming simple compounds and ions. Students will discover and be able to explain the nature of matter and its transformations when they study atomic and molecular structure, the effects of electron interaction, chemical bonds, and stoichiometry. Additionally students will study the properties of gases, acids and bases, solutions, and organic and inorganic compounds. Students will also explore chemical systems as they study solutions, reactions, and nuclear processes.

Chemistry Honors
This course covers the same major areas as Chemistry, but at a faster pace and in greater depth. Chemistry is a sequential, hierarchical science that is descriptive and theoretical. Chemistry requires high-level problem-solving skills, such as designing experiments and solving word problems. For students to learn concepts of chemistry, they must learn new vocabulary, including the rules for naming simple compounds and ions. Students will discover and be able to explain the nature of matter and its transformations when they study atomic and molecular structure, the effects of electron interaction, chemical bonds, and stoichiometry. Additionally students will study the properties of gases, acids and bases, solutions, and organic and inorganic compounds. Students will also explore chemical systems as they study solutions, reactions, and nuclear processes.

Health
Health education is a continuum of learning experiences that enables students, as individuals and as members of society, to make informed decisions, modify behaviors, and change social conditions in ways that are health enhancing and increase health literacy. The health education standards signify the essential skills and knowledge that all students need to become health literate. The health education standards represent a strong consensus of the essential knowledge and skills that students should know in grades nine through twelve in California’s public schools. The focus in the health education standards is on teaching the skills that enable students to make healthy choices and avoid high-risk behaviors. *One semester course can be taken either session 1 or 2

Physics
Physics is the study of the physical world and deals with the behavior and structure of matter. The study of physics is divided into the areas of motion, fluids, heat, sound, light, electricity, and magnetism, relativity, atomic structure, nuclear physics, and elementary particles. Students will use basic concepts, equations, and assumptions to describe the physical world and develop and understanding of the tools of physics.
 - expandSOCIAL SCIENCE CLASSES
World History
Students in grade nine or ten study major turning points that shaped the modern world, from the late eighteenth century through the present, including the cause and course of the two world wars. They trace the rise of democratic ideas and develop an understanding of the historical roots of current world issues, especially as they pertain to international relations. They extrapolate from the American experience that democratic ideals are often achieved at a high price, remain vulnerable, and are not practiced everywhere in the world. Students develop an understanding of current world issues and relate them to their historical, geographic, political, economic, and cultural contexts. Students consider multiple accounts of events in order to understand international relations from a variety of perspectives.

World History Honors
Students in grade nine or ten study major turning points that shaped the modern world, from the late eighteenth century through the present, including the cause and course of the two world wars. They trace the rise of democratic ideas and develop an understanding of the historical roots of current world issues, especially as they pertain to international relations. They extrapolate from the American experience that democratic ideals are often achieved at a high price, remain vulnerable, and are not practiced everywhere in the world. Students develop an understanding of current world issues and relate them to their historical, geographic, political, economic, and cultural contexts. Students consider multiple accounts of events in order to understand international relations from a variety of perspectives.

US History
The History-Social Science course of study is a guide to the eras and civilizations to study. These standards require students not only to acquire core knowledge in history and social science, but also to develop the critical thinking skills that historians and social scientists employ to study the past and its relationship to the present. It is possible to spend a lifetime studying history and not learn about every significant historical event; no one can know everything. However, the State Board hopes that during their years of formal schooling, students will learn to distinguish the important from the unimportant, to recognize vital connections between the present and the past, and to appreciate universal historical themes and dilemmas.

Economics
Students will master fundamental economic concepts, applying the tools (graphs, statistics, and equations) from other subject areas to the understanding of operations and institutions of economic systems. Studied in a historic context are the basic economic principles of micro- and macroeconomics, international economics, comparative economic systems, measurement, and methods. *One semester course can be taken either session 1 or 2

Economics Honors
Students will also master fundamental economic concepts, applying the tools (graphs, statistics, equations) from other subject areas to the understanding of operations and institutions of economic systems. Studied in a historic context are the basic economic principles of micro- and macroeconomics, international economics, comparative economic systems, measurement, and methods. *One semester course can be taken either session 1 or 2

US Government
Students in grade twelve pursue a deeper understanding of the institutions of American government. They compare systems of government in the world today and analyze the history and changing interpretations of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the current state of the legislative, executive, and judiciary branches of government. An emphasis is placed on analyzing the relationship among federal, state, and local governments, with particular attention paid to important historical documents such as the Federalist Papers. These standards represent the culmination of civic literacy as students prepare to vote, participate in community activities, and assume the responsibilities of citizenship. *One semester course can be taken either session 1 or 2

 - expandFOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSES
Spanish 1:
New words and phrases will be introduced with pictures, audio clips and examples. Basic Spanish grammar will be introduced to help build fluency and understand the structure of the Spanish Language. The standards for foreign language are aligned with the five goal areas specified by the National Foreign Language Standards as follows: communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.
There are a total of eleven (11) standards.
These standards are general in nature and apply to all levels of foreign language instruction. For each of the eleven standards, there are specific objectives that define what students should know and be able to do upon completion of a particular level of instruction. In addition, performance indicators, or examples of student performance and appropriate classroom activities, are provided for many of the objectives

Spanish 2:
This course will strengthen Spanish listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. The course will broaden Spanish vocabulary and the student’s knowledge of grammar. The standards for foreign language are aligned with the five goal areas specified by the National Foreign Language Standards as follows: communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. There are a total of eleven (11) standards.
These standards are general in nature and apply to all levels of foreign language instruction. For each of the eleven standards, there are specific objectives that define what students should know and be able to do upon completion of a particular level of instruction. In addition, performance indicators, or examples of student performance and appropriate classroom activities, are provided for many of the objectives

Spanish 3:
For student’s completely immersed in Spanish, students will speak, listen, read, write, and collaborate with other students in this course. The standards for foreign language are aligned with the five goal areas specified by the National Foreign Language Standards as follows: communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. There are a total of eleven (11) standards.
These standards are general in nature and apply to all levels of foreign language instruction. For each of the eleven standards, there are specific objectives that define what students should know and be able to do upon completion of a particular level of instruction. In addition, performance indicators, or examples of student performance and appropriate classroom activities, are provided for many of the objectives

Spanish 3 Honors:
The curriculum included in this document is generic to the modern languages. The modern language standards are meant to be inclusive of all languages and are not written for any specific language, however, all languages are different and have different vocabulary, syntactic structures, sound systems, writing systems, and represent different cultures.
The standards for foreign language are aligned with the five goal areas specified by the National Foreign Language Standards as follows: communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. There are a total of eleven (11) standards. These standards are general in nature and apply to all levels of foreign language instruction. For each of the eleven standards, there are specific objectives that define what students should know and be able to do upon completion of a particular level of instruction. In addition, performance indicators, or examples of student performance and appropriate classroom activities, are provided for many of the objectives.

French 1:
The curriculum included in this document is generic to the modern languages. The modern language standards are meant to be inclusive of all languages and are not written for any specific language, however, all languages are different and have different vocabulary, syntactic structures, sound systems, writing systems, and represent different cultures.

French 2:
The curriculum included in this document is generic to the modern languages. The modern language standards are meant to be inclusive of all languages and are not written for any specific language, however, all languages are different and have different vocabulary, syntactic structures, sound systems, writing systems, and represent different cultures.

 - expandADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CLASSES
AP English 11
This is an advanced English course at college freshman level designed for the student working above grade level who is university bound. In addition to being an above level course, it also prepares students to gain college credit through the Advanced Placement (AP) Exam. This course is designed to be equivalent to the introductory year of college composition course work. The AP Course Audit provides each AP teacher with a set of expectations that college and secondary school faculty nationwide have established for college-level courses. The AP English Language and Composition Exam employ multiple-choice questions to test the students’ skills in analyzing the rhetoric of prose passages. Students are also asked to write several essays to demonstrate the skills they have learned in the course. Course content is dictated by the College Board’s Advanced Placement curricular requirements.

AP English 12
This is an English course designed to meet the needs of the student working at or above grade level who plans to attend a college or university after high school. The emphasis is on the further development of writing ability in general, the development of analytical writing and the writing domains specified in the District Writing portfolio, abstract and critical thinking, further study of literary genres, an appreciation of literature, and an understanding of British literature and major British literary movements. Other things covered include vocabulary development, listening and speaking skills, and further improvement in the student’s library and research skill. The course is conducted at an accelerated level and is designed to prepare students for a college or university.

AP Calculus AB:
An interactive text, graphing software, and math symbol software combine with the exciting online course delivery to make Calculus an adventure. This course is designed to prepare the student for the AP Calculus AB exam given each year in May. With continuous enrollment, students can start the course and begin working on Calculus as early as spring of the previous year!
An Advanced Placement (AP) course in calculus consists of a full high school year of work that is comparable to calculus courses in colleges and universities. It is expected that students who take an AP course in calculus will seek college credit, college placement, or both, from institutions of higher learning. Calculus AB is primarily concerned with developing students' understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed geometrically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The connections among these representations also are important. Estimated Completion Time: This AP Calculus AB course is scheduled for 2 semesters, completed within 32-36 weeks at the traditional pace

AP Calculus BC*:
*Must have previously failed course
Calculus BC will cover topics in differential and integral calculus. This course in mathematics consists of a full and intensive academic year of work in the calculus of functions of a single variable. The courses emphasize a multirepresentational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The connections among these representations also are important. Technology should be used regularly by students and teachers to reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results. Through the use of the unifying themes of derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modeling, the course becomes a cohesive whole rather than a collection of unrelated topics. These themes are developed using all the functions listed in the prerequisites. Calculus BC is an extension of Calculus AB rather than an enhancement; common topics require a similar depth of understanding. Both courses are intended to be challenging and demanding. The topic outline for Calculus BC includes all Calculus AB topics. Additional topics involve the concept of series, series of constants and Taylor series.

Statistics AP
Statistics Advanced Placement (AP) is the science of collecting and analyzing data and turning data into information. The curriculum of this statistics course includes data analysis and statistical inference. The topics involved in data analysis include basic descriptive statistics (mean, median, mode, range, standard deviation, and percentiles), interpretation of data given in graphs and tables, elementary probability, the ability to synthesize information, to select appropriate data for answering a question, and to determine whether or not the data provided are sufficient to answer a given question.
This course of study has been prepared in conjunction with the California State Frameworks for Mathematics, the National Council for Teachers of Mathematical Standards for Curriculum and Evaluation, and the Advanced Placement course Description Guide for Statistics published by the College Board.

AP US History
The AP program in United States History is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials (their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance) and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship.

AP Macro Economics – 1st Session Only:
This is an advanced Economics course at the college level. It is designed for the student who is working above grade level and is equivalent to an introductory college course in econoimcs. This course prepares students to gain college credit through the Advanced Placement Exam. Course content is dictated by College Board’s Advanced Placement course requirements and by District and state standards and includes both macroeconomics and microeconomics. The material included in the course descriptions and in the two examinations has been selected by economists who serve as members of the AP Development Committee in Economics. In establishing the courses and examinations, the Committee surveyed the economics departments of the 200 institutions receiving the most AP grades in economics. Using the information obtained about the content of typical introductory college courses, the Committee developed the course outline and had the multiple-choice questions covering the outline pre-tested on college students enrolled in the appropriate economics courses. The AP course descriptions and examinations are thus representative of college courses and are, therefore, considered appropriate for the measurement of skills and knowledge in the fields of introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. The purpose of an AP course in Macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics. The following are topics and aspects that may be explored:
  1. Basic economic concepts
  2. Measurement of economic performance
  3. National income and price determination
  4. Economic growth
  5. International finance, exchange rates, and balance of payments

AP Micro Economics – 2nd Session Only:
This is an advanced Economics course at the college level. It is designed for the student who is working above grade level and is equivalent to an introductory college course in economics. This course prepares students to gain college credit through the Advanced Placement Exam. Course content is dictated by College Board’s Advanced Placement course requirements and by District and state standards and includes both macroeconomics and microeconomics. The material included in the course descriptions and in the two examinations has been selected by economists who serve as members of the AP Development Committee in Economics. In establishing the courses and examinations, the Committee surveyed the economics departments of the 200 institutions receiving the most AP grades in economics. Using the information obtained about the content of typical introductory college courses, the Committee developed the course outline and had the multiple-choice questions covering the outline pre-tested on college students enrolled in the appropriate economics courses. The AP course descriptions and examinations are thus representative of college courses and are, therefore, considered appropriate for the measurement of skills and knowledge in the fields of introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics. The purpose of an AP course in Microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. The following topics and aspects may be explored:
  1. Basic economic concepts
  2. The nature and functions of product markets
  3. Factor markets
  4. Efficiency, equity, and the role of government

AP Government
A well-designed Advanced Placement (AP) course in United States (U.S.) Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the U.S. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. While there is no single approach that an United States Government and Politics AP course must follow, students should become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes. Certain topics are usually covered in all college courses. The following are topics and questions that should be explored in the course:
  1. Constitutional underpinnings of United States Government
  2. Political beliefs and behaviors
  3. Political parties, interest groups, and mass media
  4. Institutions of national government
  5. Public policy
  6. Civil rights and civil liberties

AP Psychology
The Advanced Placement Program offers a course and exam in Psychology to qualified students who wish to complete studies in secondary school equivalent to an introductory college course in psychology. The exam presumes at least one semester of college-level preparation. The AP Psychology Course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice



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